<The Gender ADs Project>

 

Body Parts II

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<Background: In popular culture worlds the identity of women is associated with the anonymity of body parts. As Hall and Crum demonstrated (1994) males are represented in advertising through their faces, while females are tied to their bodies and specific body parts. Other exhibitions in this project focus on the prevalence of associating women with their body parts. These include their breasts, as well as their bodies in general. Often, the female body is subject to reductionism. In this exhibit a similar ploy is at hand: the reduction of women to their object-ive statuses, such as through their butts and vaginas.  The Ads: Many of these ads attack the privacy of women by focusing on them as being identified with one body part. Some of the images, such as 3 and 4, were created by PETA in one of many controversial ad campaigns. A number come from non-western contexts, such as images 20 and 21. One of the most shocking ones is image 26 in which a bowling ball is associated with a woman's buttocks. Questions: (1) Why are these specific body parts the targets of advertisers and companies? (2) What is the effect of the reduction of a woman's body (and identity) to one or two body parts? (3) How can men be convinced to see the association of women with their body parts as a negative? >

 

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<presented by Scott A. Lukas, Ph.D.>