<The Gender ADs Project>

 

Death

------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

<Background: The forms of violence and misogyny are very prolific in popular culture. In pornographic genres, it is common to find women the subjects of assault, violence and death, often in sexualized contexts such as in snuff films. One might assume that such representations would be confined to hard core pornography, but in fact one finds numerous representations of death in mainstream advertising. As the ads below might suggest—both in their numbers and themes—everyone should be worried about advertising. The Ads: This set of ads might be the most disturbing ads. Consider the basic idea at work here—advertisers and corporations are saying that death can be used to sell products. This alone should make us stop being consumers! In addition to the many corpse ads (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37), we see ads depicting shark attacks (11), burning (5, 25), being hit by a train (9), hanging (10, 15), being ground up (14), being a drunk driver (17), being shot (23, 24, 27), falling out of a window (38), and being brutalized (28, 29, 30). Images 48 and 49 are from a recent Italian campaigning associating caskets with objectified models. Resources: This feature on a recent death and models shoot in the show America's Next Top Model is worth a look. Questions: (1) If you asked someone about the ads below, he or she might say, "It's just advertising and it's meant to shock people?" How would you respond to this claim? (2) What are some of the political, social, sexual or psychological reasons why death seems so common in ads? (3) Why are more women represented in situations of death than men? (4) How can everyday citizens convince advertisers to not use themes such as death in their ads? >

 

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

Image 4

Image 5

Image 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 7

Image 8

Image 9

Image 10

Image 11

Image 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 13

Image 14

Image 15

Image 16

Image 17

Image 18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 19

Image 20

Image 21

Image 22

Image 23

Image 24

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 25

Image 26

Image 27

Image 28

Image 29

Image 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 31

Image 32

Image 33

Image 34

Image 35

Image 36

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 37

Image 38

Image 39

Image 40

Image 41

Image 42

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 43

Image 44

Image 45

Image 46

Image 47

Image 48

           
Image 49

Image 50

Image 51

Image 52

Image 53

Image 54

           
Image 55

Image 56

Image 57

Image 58

Image 59

Image 60

   
           
Image 61

Image 62

Image 63

Image 64

Image 65

Image 66

           
           
         

Home

         

 

 

<presented by Scott A. Lukas, Ph.D.>